Marker Mic Drop, Marker Mic Drop Moments

Marker Mic Drop Moment #3: Roberto Gudiño, Faculty and Head of Production (Scottsdale Community College, AZ)

This Marker Mic Drop Moment goes to Professor Roberto Gudiño, Faculty and Head of Production of the Scottsdale School of Film and Theatre at Scottsdale Community College in Arizona. Professor Gudiño was one of the participants at the mindSpark Learning EdTech Institute I facilitated in San Diego, CA. He was awarded a new Promethean Panel for his final presentation of an interactive Google Site that his students will use in the fall semester.

Roberto is a first generation college student who earned his MFA in Film Production at UCLA’s film school, one of the top in the country. He also earned his Master of Science in Mass Communication from Florida International University, and has achieved a number of other academic accomplishments. His dream is to help future filmmakers acquire the skills they need to achieve their dreams, especially in an ever-changing world of technology.

The mindSpark Learning EdTech Institute is designed to equip teachers with technology tools to best prepare their students for the modern workforce. The San Diego participants ranged from a kindergarten teacher to college professor, all realizing the need to start preparing their students now for the future.

The educators were exposed to a number of tools, but first situated their use of technology with realistic discussions of their “why” for technology in the classroom. Professor Gudiño echoed the sentiments of his fellow participants: They all want their students to make meaningful connections, be intentional and thoughtful in their tech use, and to make their devices more than a fancy notepad. The two-day workshop required presentations of how tech would be implemented into their classroom, giving teachers tangible materials that they had built in a day to have for future lessons.

“I know [the Institute] definitely helped my students learn the skills necessary to succeed in the 21st century.”

Professor Gudiño had very kind words to say about mindSpark Learning’s summer institute:

“Padrah, our EdTech Institute facilitator, was amazing! She guided us through concrete ideas on how to apply EdTech in the classroom and we had ample opportunities to practice hands-on with different tech tools. The pace of the learning institute was perfect as we collaborated in groups with various educators from throughout the country. What a great experience! I couldn’t recommend this institute more and I know it definitely helped my students learn the skills necessary to succeed in the 21st century.”

Participants compiled a number of EdTech tools they had learned the previous day and a half to develop a personalized resource for their class. Roberto Gudiño’s class site is a polished example that integrates a number of tools, particularly making use of the GSuite products.

Asking the question, “What’s your why?”

Professor Gudiño’s care and thoughtfulness toward his students was immediately evident in our morning discussions about his why behind teaching with tech. His concern for how best to equip his students with the skills they will need for a competitive workforce drives his desire to learn more about technology use in the classroom. Professor Gudiño’s growth mindset is admirable because he clearly wants what is best for his students.

In a matter of a couple hours, Professor Gudiño created an interactive class site that could be used for his Film Story Structure unit. The site is engaging, visually appealing, and goes well beyond the sage on the stage, sit and get teaching style.

One of Professor Gudiño’s strength? Diversification. The site first hooks students with an edpuzzle to test their knowledge and weaves a number of activities throughout thereafter. Students not only complete Google Forms for discussion and exit tickets, but ultimately create an Adobe Spark video to bring their knowledge and understanding to a creative and personalized form.

Professor Gudiño’s worked throughout the institute with great care and empathy toward his students. His questions and insights clearly demonstrated that he wanted to be intentional about his teaching. He is not interested in using tech simply for the sake of tech, but instead wants to best serve his students throughout various mediums but with purpose. To compliment this mindset, he expects the same of his students. Professor Gudiño hopes his students will foster the same intentional attitude about their use of tech in their studies and future work in the cinema world.

Professor Roberto Gudiño is a model example of the growth mindset needed among educators today in this ever-changing world. His intentional and mindful attitude and professionalism along with artistic creativity makes him a role model for future film students. Great work and thank you again, Professor Gudiño!

Follow Professor Roberto Gudiño at http://www.robertogudino.com/ to see more of the exciting work he is bringing to students, fellow educators, and the cinema world.

Marker Mic Drop Moments

Marker Mic Drop #2: María José García Vizcaino (Montclair State University)

How would you describe these photos in detail?
Image source: http://www.pexels.com

Imagine it’s a Friday night and you are headed to the movies with friends or family. You settle in with your popcorn, endure too many previews, then the opening scene of the feature film finally begins. It’s quiet, no music. You hear a little rustling and perhaps some footsteps. There’s a loud banging – was that a door? – and then nothing. You can tell the screen is filled with dark tones because you do not sense any bright white flashes. You can feel the suspense as the silence ensues until finally, there is another disruption. Loud noises, the sound of two men struggling, and what sounds like pots and pans are falling all around them. Are they in a kitchen? Who are these two men? What do they look like?

As a person with no vision issues, I’ve taken for granted how much I could gather from the opening scene of a movie. I immediately know the environment, can make assumptions about the characters based on their physical stature, and can feel the intensity of the plot because I have the visual attached to this experience. What if you were deprived of this opportunity, though, every time you watched a video?

Jason Strother, freelance journalist and adjunct professor of journalism at Montclair State University in New Jersey, reported for Public Radio International (PRI) on audio accessibility services in the United States, namely Spanish audio description. While the services have improved over time, resources are limited but slowly on the rise for Spanish speakers. Audiobooks have become more prevalent but theatres are not required to provide audio description in any language.

It’s a translation not from one language into another, but from one medium to another.”

María José García Vizcaino, Associate Professor of Spanish and Latino Studies at Montclair University, created the Spanish Audio Description course, a first of its kind. Her students, many native Spanish speakers, first recognize and work through their dialectal differences in vocabulary in order for the language to be uniform in its translation. Professor García Vizcaino emphasizes that the class is not only working on traditional translation, but also transforming the experience by taking the language from one medium to another. The images that the visually impaired cannot see are “translated” into the oral form, thus allowing them to recreate the scene with their imaginations.

These students do not just sit in their classrooms and watch movies to translate. The class partners with New York’s Repertorio Español to enhance the live theatre experience. A student watches the production on a live black and white monitor from the costume room, providing description to the theatre patrons wearing the visually-impaired accommodated headsets.

“This was my first time in a theatre,” 58-year-old Saeed Golnabi said after the show.

I would like to commend Professor García Vizcaino for the amazing work she is doing with her classes. The marker mic drop for me is the amount of empathy displayed throughout her students’ work. The examples are endless. Let’s name a few:

  • Cultural differences: Students realized dialectal differences when coming from various Spanish-speaking countries. (For example, the word for “supermarket” can vary greatly per country.) Communication opens up in recognizing these nuances.
  • Looking closer at their own community: Students had to put themselves into the visually-impaired person’s world to understand what they lack in a theatre experience.
  • Service learning: Students not only increased their knowledge and developed empathy within the four walls of the classroom. More importantly, they took this knowledge and served the community. You can hear the joy in Saeed Golnabi’s voice, a 58-year-old man who was leaving his first live theatre experience. He had also only been to the movies a couple times in his life.

Teachers, how are your students applying their learning? We are easily swept up in covering the content by the end of the year, but what is our true goal? That we made it through Chapter 20 in the textbook? Or should it be that our students walk away with valuable lessons and touch the lives of those around them?

My previous school, Mullen High School in Denver, CO, taught me the difference between the standard community service graduation requirement and service learning. The Lasallian Catholic motto of “Enter to learn, leave to serve,” greets students and faculty every day upon entering the school.

This principle has greatly affected the way that I approach my lesson planning and what I want my students to know and feel when they walk out my door. I cannot say that my teaching has involved life-altering projects to benefit the community, but my mindset made a significant shift from my four walls to the bigger picture. The first step in approaching a marker mic drop moment like Professor García Vizcaino? Start the discussion. Look at your local community. Make comparisons. I think you will find that students crave a voice. Allow them this voice and I’m certain they will astound you with their compassion and perspective.

Thank you, Professor García Vizcaino, for bringing an example of how our teaching and student learning can affect the community.

For the full article, click here: Visually impaired non-English speakers face accessibility language barrier at the movies (Jason Strother, PRI)

Marker Mic Drop Moments

Marker Mic Drop #1 – Dairren Gibson

Image source: Dairren Gibson

Dairren Gibson, STEM Instructor and Digital Learning Facilitator at Mater Academy in Las Vegas, NV, attended mindSpark Learning’s San Diego Google Certification Institute in May 2019. Modeled after Google’s own Demo Slam, Dairren and his fellow participants highlighted the good work they are doing in their classrooms in two minutes or less. The array of talent and ingenuity was impressive. The prize clearly went to Mr. Gibson when he showed us his idea for a personalized digital vocabulary notebook and impressive stop animation videos.

The vocabulary notebook uses Google Slides and Hyperdocs, allowing students to personalize their notebook with a picture of themselves, and reinforce the definition of a word through a variety of ways (synonyms, antonyms, and my favorite, life examples). While this is arguably a fancy worksheet, this only scrapes the surface of tools Dairren uses to constantly expose his elementary-age students to technology. This tech tool will begin teaching young students how to better organize their papers. (Have we not all seen the notebook that looked like it was hit by a tornado?) Students will ultimately become comfortable with technology by the time they graduate from high school and therefore more prepared for a working world that will demand those skills.

Thank you, Dairren, for sharing the amazing work you do at your school. A big congratulations as well on becoming a Level 1 Google Certified Educator!